From part of my quiet time readings this morning.  This quote is taken from  Charles Spurgeon’s Morning & Evening Devotional.

Let us, by the aid of the gracious Comforter, shake off those doubts and fears which so much mar our peace and comfort. Be this our prayer, that we may have done with the harsh croaking voice of surmise and suspicion, and may be able to speak with the clear, melodious voice of full assurance.

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28 comments
  1. I like it in a way – but at some point we need to struggle to know peace; we need to have felt fear to know comfort; we need to be unsure of ourselves to find out the depth of assurance…all in all – all things work together for the good of those that love God (even pain).

  2. I like it in a way – but at some point we need to struggle to know peace; we need to have felt fear to know comfort; we need to be unsure of ourselves to find out the depth of assurance…all in all – all things work together for the good of those that love God (even pain).

  3. I like it in a way – but at some point we need to struggle to know peace; we need to have felt fear to know comfort; we need to be unsure of ourselves to find out the depth of assurance…all in all – all things work together for the good of those that love God (even pain).

  4. This was the verse that accompanied Spurgeon’s devotion.

    “O Lord, You have pleaded the case for my soul;

    You have redeemed my life,” (Lamentations 3:58, NKJV).

    I agree with you, but in the life of a believer doubt shouldn’t be the hallmark – there are seasons of doubt, but it shouldn’t quench our faith. We can have assurance.

  5. This was the verse that accompanied Spurgeon’s devotion.

    “O Lord, You have pleaded the case for my soul;

    You have redeemed my life,” (Lamentations 3:58, NKJV).

    I agree with you, but in the life of a believer doubt shouldn’t be the hallmark – there are seasons of doubt, but it shouldn’t quench our faith. We can have assurance.

  6. This was the verse that accompanied Spurgeon’s devotion.

    “O Lord, You have pleaded the case for my soul;

    You have redeemed my life,” (Lamentations 3:58, NKJV).

    I agree with you, but in the life of a believer doubt shouldn’t be the hallmark – there are seasons of doubt, but it shouldn’t quench our faith. We can have assurance.

  7. This was the verse that accompanied Spurgeon’s devotion.

    “O Lord, You have pleaded the case for my soul;

    You have redeemed my life,” (Lamentations 3:58, NKJV).

    I agree with you, but in the life of a believer doubt shouldn’t be the hallmark – there are seasons of doubt, but it shouldn’t quench our faith. We can have assurance.

  8. We must decide what the shape of our lives must take,take action to actualize our potentials and God given destiny

  9. We must decide what the shape of our lives must take,take action to actualize our potentials and God given destiny

  10. “I guess it depends on what you mean by change.” (Shane)

    I would say change in terms of parts of doctrinal codes or focus of the faith system we apply to our lives (or even that we teach).

  11. “I guess it depends on what you mean by change.” (Shane)

    I would say change in terms of parts of doctrinal codes or focus of the faith system we apply to our lives (or even that we teach).

  12. “I guess it depends on what you mean by change.” (Shane)

    I would say change in terms of parts of doctrinal codes or focus of the faith system we apply to our lives (or even that we teach).

  13. I would disagree in regards to major points of doctrine, also in areas of practice… it depends on what is driving it and what area of scripture we are talking about.

    Really none of what you have brought up in previous comments are new arguments or haven’t been addressed before. So I don’t think doubt should drive how we approach Scripture. You and I obviously have a difference of opinion on that.

    I believe the Bible because it is true. Evidence has convinced me of that. Is faith still involved? Yes, absolutely, but I don’t have an irrational faith. Some would say (and I’m not saying you are in this camp) that it is true because I believe it.

    In saying this – my intent is not to condemn those who doubt. Peter doubted, Thomas doubted… all of the apostles when Jesus was arrested and crucified doubted. They just didn’t stay there.

    Also, I’m not saying that we will know all there is to know either – there is a mystery to God and being finite beings we can’t comprehend an infinite God.

  14. I would disagree in regards to major points of doctrine, also in areas of practice… it depends on what is driving it and what area of scripture we are talking about.

    Really none of what you have brought up in previous comments are new arguments or haven’t been addressed before. So I don’t think doubt should drive how we approach Scripture. You and I obviously have a difference of opinion on that.

    I believe the Bible because it is true. Evidence has convinced me of that. Is faith still involved? Yes, absolutely, but I don’t have an irrational faith. Some would say (and I’m not saying you are in this camp) that it is true because I believe it.

    In saying this – my intent is not to condemn those who doubt. Peter doubted, Thomas doubted… all of the apostles when Jesus was arrested and crucified doubted. They just didn’t stay there.

    Also, I’m not saying that we will know all there is to know either – there is a mystery to God and being finite beings we can’t comprehend an infinite God.

  15. I would disagree in regards to major points of doctrine, also in areas of practice… it depends on what is driving it and what area of scripture we are talking about.

    Really none of what you have brought up in previous comments are new arguments or haven’t been addressed before. So I don’t think doubt should drive how we approach Scripture. You and I obviously have a difference of opinion on that.

    I believe the Bible because it is true. Evidence has convinced me of that. Is faith still involved? Yes, absolutely, but I don’t have an irrational faith. Some would say (and I’m not saying you are in this camp) that it is true because I believe it.

    In saying this – my intent is not to condemn those who doubt. Peter doubted, Thomas doubted… all of the apostles when Jesus was arrested and crucified doubted. They just didn’t stay there.

    Also, I’m not saying that we will know all there is to know either – there is a mystery to God and being finite beings we can’t comprehend an infinite God.

  16. “I would disagree in regards to major points of doctrine, also in areas of practice… it depends on what is driving it and what area of scripture we are talking about.” (Shane)

    I am not talking about changing scripture – I wouldn’t even go there personally – since they were written based on certian experiences (no one really has a right to change any of that). But doctrine does not mean it is sound scripture interpretation – it just means someone made this would be how we would see the scriptures. I think a lot of the stuff is open for dialogue. As for areas of practice – I would also move towards change in certain areas also. Sorry I never got into specifics.

    “They just didn’t stay there.” (Shane)

    Having doubts isn’t the actual problem though – for most people that leave the church – questions going unanswered or the rigidity of the structure is. Doubt has very little to do with the problems in the church – surety does.

    I kind of laugh in a way about this since we are both part of a faith that is so sure of everything they say – to the point of having all the answers (or so it seems). But one aspect of faith is not having all the answers answered and leaning on your questions (ie: is there a God? Yes! Is there proof? Maybe? Well no). Faith is faith for a reason – and I am not sure there is anything wrong with that…just like I think faith requires some level of doubting/questioning – since the answers are not always evident. I actually poise that questioning is part of this faith like mystery is part of the God we serve.

  17. “I would disagree in regards to major points of doctrine, also in areas of practice… it depends on what is driving it and what area of scripture we are talking about.” (Shane)

    I am not talking about changing scripture – I wouldn’t even go there personally – since they were written based on certian experiences (no one really has a right to change any of that). But doctrine does not mean it is sound scripture interpretation – it just means someone made this would be how we would see the scriptures. I think a lot of the stuff is open for dialogue. As for areas of practice – I would also move towards change in certain areas also. Sorry I never got into specifics.

    “They just didn’t stay there.” (Shane)

    Having doubts isn’t the actual problem though – for most people that leave the church – questions going unanswered or the rigidity of the structure is. Doubt has very little to do with the problems in the church – surety does.

    I kind of laugh in a way about this since we are both part of a faith that is so sure of everything they say – to the point of having all the answers (or so it seems). But one aspect of faith is not having all the answers answered and leaning on your questions (ie: is there a God? Yes! Is there proof? Maybe? Well no). Faith is faith for a reason – and I am not sure there is anything wrong with that…just like I think faith requires some level of doubting/questioning – since the answers are not always evident. I actually poise that questioning is part of this faith like mystery is part of the God we serve.

  18. “I would disagree in regards to major points of doctrine, also in areas of practice… it depends on what is driving it and what area of scripture we are talking about.” (Shane)

    I am not talking about changing scripture – I wouldn’t even go there personally – since they were written based on certian experiences (no one really has a right to change any of that). But doctrine does not mean it is sound scripture interpretation – it just means someone made this would be how we would see the scriptures. I think a lot of the stuff is open for dialogue. As for areas of practice – I would also move towards change in certain areas also. Sorry I never got into specifics.

    “They just didn’t stay there.” (Shane)

    Having doubts isn’t the actual problem though – for most people that leave the church – questions going unanswered or the rigidity of the structure is. Doubt has very little to do with the problems in the church – surety does.

    I kind of laugh in a way about this since we are both part of a faith that is so sure of everything they say – to the point of having all the answers (or so it seems). But one aspect of faith is not having all the answers answered and leaning on your questions (ie: is there a God? Yes! Is there proof? Maybe? Well no). Faith is faith for a reason – and I am not sure there is anything wrong with that…just like I think faith requires some level of doubting/questioning – since the answers are not always evident. I actually poise that questioning is part of this faith like mystery is part of the God we serve.

  19. “I would disagree in regards to major points of doctrine, also in areas of practice… it depends on what is driving it and what area of scripture we are talking about.” (Shane)

    I am not talking about changing scripture – I wouldn’t even go there personally – since they were written based on certian experiences (no one really has a right to change any of that). But doctrine does not mean it is sound scripture interpretation – it just means someone made this would be how we would see the scriptures. I think a lot of the stuff is open for dialogue. As for areas of practice – I would also move towards change in certain areas also. Sorry I never got into specifics.

    “They just didn’t stay there.” (Shane)

    Having doubts isn’t the actual problem though – for most people that leave the church – questions going unanswered or the rigidity of the structure is. Doubt has very little to do with the problems in the church – surety does.

    I kind of laugh in a way about this since we are both part of a faith that is so sure of everything they say – to the point of having all the answers (or so it seems). But one aspect of faith is not having all the answers answered and leaning on your questions (ie: is there a God? Yes! Is there proof? Maybe? Well no). Faith is faith for a reason – and I am not sure there is anything wrong with that…just like I think faith requires some level of doubting/questioning – since the answers are not always evident. I actually poise that questioning is part of this faith like mystery is part of the God we serve.

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