I’m sorry that I’ve been doing so much political blogging lately (not really, but I’ve been pretty imbalanced – should slow down after Super Tuesday though).  Greg Koukl of Stand to Reason answers this question, watch the video and share your thoughts.

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9 comments
  1. I think his thoughts are very well thought out and quite good – I am wary of when someone tries to pigeon hole the gospel to one aspect of the faith (ex: social justice) – that being said – I see a lot of focus on Jesus and that early community in this area and less on the way we see the church now (very ritual oreintated).

    I think it makes sense to use the gospel in our daily lives and relationships and that’s the level where this all makes sense (ie: individual and communal ideology). I would wonder what Greg would reduce the gospel to – and maybe he wouldn’t. But we all need to re-adjust our focus irregardless with out interactions with the gospel – maybe we need more ‘real’ social justice and less charities.

  2. I think his thoughts are very well thought out and quite good – I am wary of when someone tries to pigeon hole the gospel to one aspect of the faith (ex: social justice) – that being said – I see a lot of focus on Jesus and that early community in this area and less on the way we see the church now (very ritual oreintated).

    I think it makes sense to use the gospel in our daily lives and relationships and that’s the level where this all makes sense (ie: individual and communal ideology). I would wonder what Greg would reduce the gospel to – and maybe he wouldn’t. But we all need to re-adjust our focus irregardless with out interactions with the gospel – maybe we need more ‘real’ social justice and less charities.

  3. I think his thoughts are very well thought out and quite good – I am wary of when someone tries to pigeon hole the gospel to one aspect of the faith (ex: social justice) – that being said – I see a lot of focus on Jesus and that early community in this area and less on the way we see the church now (very ritual oreintated).

    I think it makes sense to use the gospel in our daily lives and relationships and that’s the level where this all makes sense (ie: individual and communal ideology). I would wonder what Greg would reduce the gospel to – and maybe he wouldn’t. But we all need to re-adjust our focus irregardless with out interactions with the gospel – maybe we need more ‘real’ social justice and less charities.

  4. “what would you say the difference is between social justice and charity?” (Shane)

    Well one can give money to a problem in society and this works for cancer and Aids. However there are other problems in society that need more than mere charity (giving) – like poverty issues. We can throw money at it or even open soup kitchens – but that’s not an answer – that’s an allevation of the problem. Programs are needed and ‘justice’ for the people who don’t have the money and education to solve it.

    However, I refer to justice usually on issues of people groups treated unjustly – that’s where I usually take this comment (ie: First Nations people or African American communities and the poverty there and how that came about). So some things are a lot deeper than basic surface value.

    I think that’s what I mean by charity and social justice – they are different and even their very wording will show that. I liked Greg’s speech – I think he is aiming at something noble – however he never really mentions his focus?

  5. “what would you say the difference is between social justice and charity?” (Shane)

    Well one can give money to a problem in society and this works for cancer and Aids. However there are other problems in society that need more than mere charity (giving) – like poverty issues. We can throw money at it or even open soup kitchens – but that’s not an answer – that’s an allevation of the problem. Programs are needed and ‘justice’ for the people who don’t have the money and education to solve it.

    However, I refer to justice usually on issues of people groups treated unjustly – that’s where I usually take this comment (ie: First Nations people or African American communities and the poverty there and how that came about). So some things are a lot deeper than basic surface value.

    I think that’s what I mean by charity and social justice – they are different and even their very wording will show that. I liked Greg’s speech – I think he is aiming at something noble – however he never really mentions his focus?

  6. “what would you say the difference is between social justice and charity?” (Shane)

    Well one can give money to a problem in society and this works for cancer and Aids. However there are other problems in society that need more than mere charity (giving) – like poverty issues. We can throw money at it or even open soup kitchens – but that’s not an answer – that’s an allevation of the problem. Programs are needed and ‘justice’ for the people who don’t have the money and education to solve it.

    However, I refer to justice usually on issues of people groups treated unjustly – that’s where I usually take this comment (ie: First Nations people or African American communities and the poverty there and how that came about). So some things are a lot deeper than basic surface value.

    I think that’s what I mean by charity and social justice – they are different and even their very wording will show that. I liked Greg’s speech – I think he is aiming at something noble – however he never really mentions his focus?

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