I’d like to get your feedback on this.  What comes to mind when you read this statement – “God is sufficient”?  Meaning that God is totally and absolutely complete within Himself.  He needs nothing.  In Paul’s sermon to the men of Athens in the Areopagus.

The God who made the world and everything in it, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in temples made by man, nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all mankind life and breath and everything, (Acts 17:24-25, ESV).

Does that give you peace?  Does it make you feel let down?  Do you believe that or not?

Anyway I’d love to hear your thoughts.

12 comments
  1. For me the idea that God is seperate from His creation makes all the difference. Because he is seperate He is able to help in ways that created beings cannot. Of course much of his help comes through His spirit living in His creation. So yes, that does give me peace.

    I posted my view of who God is last year at http://eye4redemption.blogspot.com/2007/10/god-is.html – if you have a chance take a peek and let me know what you think.

    Happy Wednesday Shane!

  2. For me the idea that God is seperate from His creation makes all the difference. Because he is seperate He is able to help in ways that created beings cannot. Of course much of his help comes through His spirit living in His creation. So yes, that does give me peace.

    I posted my view of who God is last year at http://eye4redemption.blogspot.com/2007/10/god-is.html – if you have a chance take a peek and let me know what you think.

    Happy Wednesday Shane!

  3. For me the idea that God is seperate from His creation makes all the difference. Because he is seperate He is able to help in ways that created beings cannot. Of course much of his help comes through His spirit living in His creation. So yes, that does give me peace.

    I posted my view of who God is last year at http://eye4redemption.blogspot.com/2007/10/god-is.html – if you have a chance take a peek and let me know what you think.

    Happy Wednesday Shane!

  4. My take on this passage, when read in a slightly larger context of a few more surrounding verses, is that Paul is being slightly sarcastic to the Epicurean and Stoic thinkers of Athens. He’s quite directly challenging their notions of their (many!) man-made gods, in particular pointing out the altar to an unknown god, and that in fact, the true God is ironically the one they know nothing about! (insert Paul’s teaching and testimony on the subject! 🙂 )

    To speak directly to your wonder, though, the notion that God exists without my “aid” (i.e. sufficient without my efforts and works) is quite a relief to me. I tend to believe that while God does not “need” our efforts, he smiles a smile of delight or cries tears of sadness depending on the nature of our various actions in the world. I guess, my take on it might be, yes, complete unto himself, but in a constant state of hopefulness and yearning for reciprocity and relationship from his created ones. For love and worship. When you go on to v. 27 it says that God made us so we would seek him. And further on, he begins talking about our children of God status. The prospect of a God who doesn’t need one single thing from me to be all who he is, but delighting in me all the same fills me with an immense amount of awe and humility, and desire to worship and please him.

  5. My take on this passage, when read in a slightly larger context of a few more surrounding verses, is that Paul is being slightly sarcastic to the Epicurean and Stoic thinkers of Athens. He’s quite directly challenging their notions of their (many!) man-made gods, in particular pointing out the altar to an unknown god, and that in fact, the true God is ironically the one they know nothing about! (insert Paul’s teaching and testimony on the subject! 🙂 )

    To speak directly to your wonder, though, the notion that God exists without my “aid” (i.e. sufficient without my efforts and works) is quite a relief to me. I tend to believe that while God does not “need” our efforts, he smiles a smile of delight or cries tears of sadness depending on the nature of our various actions in the world. I guess, my take on it might be, yes, complete unto himself, but in a constant state of hopefulness and yearning for reciprocity and relationship from his created ones. For love and worship. When you go on to v. 27 it says that God made us so we would seek him. And further on, he begins talking about our children of God status. The prospect of a God who doesn’t need one single thing from me to be all who he is, but delighting in me all the same fills me with an immense amount of awe and humility, and desire to worship and please him.

  6. My take on this passage, when read in a slightly larger context of a few more surrounding verses, is that Paul is being slightly sarcastic to the Epicurean and Stoic thinkers of Athens. He’s quite directly challenging their notions of their (many!) man-made gods, in particular pointing out the altar to an unknown god, and that in fact, the true God is ironically the one they know nothing about! (insert Paul’s teaching and testimony on the subject! 🙂 )

    To speak directly to your wonder, though, the notion that God exists without my “aid” (i.e. sufficient without my efforts and works) is quite a relief to me. I tend to believe that while God does not “need” our efforts, he smiles a smile of delight or cries tears of sadness depending on the nature of our various actions in the world. I guess, my take on it might be, yes, complete unto himself, but in a constant state of hopefulness and yearning for reciprocity and relationship from his created ones. For love and worship. When you go on to v. 27 it says that God made us so we would seek him. And further on, he begins talking about our children of God status. The prospect of a God who doesn’t need one single thing from me to be all who he is, but delighting in me all the same fills me with an immense amount of awe and humility, and desire to worship and please him.

Comments are closed.

Get CT In Your Inbox!

Don't miss a single update.

You May Also Like

America’s Last Christian Generation?

Collin Brendemuehl: Could this be the last generation of well-meaning evangelicals in the US? There’s a good chance of it.

Who Really Limits Atonement?

Saw the following statement on Christ’s atonement made by Charles Haddon Spurgeon…

Feeding Sheep or Amusing Goats?

Charles Haddon Spurgeon, a powerful and effective English Baptist preacher, faced the same modern mega-Church and Church growth proposals advocated today.

Revive Us Again (Psalm 85)

To the choirmaster. A Psalm of the Sons of Korah. 85:1 Lord,…