Well, not really, but it seems like those of us who consider ourselves as evangelicals get treated to a lot of vitriol from the left.  Both the secular and religious left.

A new reader and commenter here at CT: Collin Brendemuehl had on his blog this quote from Iain Murray in his article “Evangelicalism Divided” published in the Christian Century.

Behind the methods and message of Billy Graham, behind the revivalistic phenomenon which has just extended its lease on Madison Square Garden and emerged on national television, is a portentous development to which the nation’s press and most of its churches are curiously blind. It is the attempted revival of fundamentalism as a major factor in Protestant life. The narrow and divisive creed which the churches rejected a generation ago is staging a comeback. Through skillful manipulation of means and persons, including a well publicized association with the President of the United States, fundamentalist forces are now in a position aggressively to exploit the churches. If their efforts succeed, it will make mincemeat of the ecumenical movement, will divide congregations and denominations, will set back Protestant Christianity a half century.

Want to guess when this was written?

April 30, 1958 – I’d say their version of “Protestant Christianity” perhaps needed a set back.  What do you think?

10 comments
  1. Was browsing an interesting study the other day that distinguished between evangelicals and fundamentalists according to theological and political positions. One can be evangelical without being fundamentalist. Some months ago in the Chronicle of Higher Education there was an article about the rise of “cosmopolitan” evangelicalism in academe. Just saying, you’re using blunt definitions.

  2. Was browsing an interesting study the other day that distinguished between evangelicals and fundamentalists according to theological and political positions. One can be evangelical without being fundamentalist. Some months ago in the Chronicle of Higher Education there was an article about the rise of “cosmopolitan” evangelicalism in academe. Just saying, you’re using blunt definitions.

  3. Mark,

    I don’t disagree with you, nor do I agree with the quote above. You are right evangelicals and fundamentalists are different. They haven’t necessarily been treated as such from the secular or religious left though. As you can see from the quote above.

  4. Mark,

    I don’t disagree with you, nor do I agree with the quote above. You are right evangelicals and fundamentalists are different. They haven’t necessarily been treated as such from the secular or religious left though. As you can see from the quote above.

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