Did you hear what the Connecticut Legislature’s Committee on Judiciary tried to pull?  They (in particular the Democratic co-chairs of the commitee, Rep. Michael P. Lawlor and Sen. Andrew McDonald) thought that dictating the structure of the Roman Catholic Church was a good idea.

Introducing Raised Bill No. 1098:

(a) A corporation may be organized in connection with any Roman Catholic Church or congregation in this state, by filing in the office of the Secretary of the State a certificate signed by the archbishop or bishop and the vicar-general of the archdiocese or of the diocese in which such congregation is located and the pastor and two laymen belonging to such congregation, stating that they have so organized for the purposes hereinafter mentioned. [Such archbishop or bishop, vicar-general and pastor of such congregation and, in case of the death or other disability of the archbishop or bishop, the administrator of the archdiocese or diocese for the time being, the chancellor of the archdiocese or diocese and the pastor of such congregation shall be members, ex officio, of such corporation, and, upon their death, resignation, removal or preferment, their successors in office shall become such members in their stead. The two lay members shall be appointed annually, in writing, during the month of January from the lay members of the congregation by a majority of the ex-officio members of the corporation; and three members of the corporation, of whom one shall be a layman, shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business.]

(b) The corporation shall have a board of directors consisting of not less than seven nor more than thirteen lay members. The archbishop or bishop of the diocese or his designee shall serve as an ex-officio member of the board of directors without the right to vote.

HT: Hot Air

Problem… oh, yeah the Constitution says we can’t do that.  In particular the establishment clause in the First Amendment.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Then they were targeting one particular religion as well.  Government can not tell a religious organization how it is to be structured.  Period.  Even if you are not Catholic this should be of concern to you.

The Anchoress notes:

My email has been exploding with horrified reactions – and not just from Catholics. Most people of faith understand that this is an unconstitutional and dangerous incursion by a state, and one that ought to be resisted with all our might, and a precedent that could potentially bring all religions under the control of the government. Morrissey is quite right to make the comparison to China, where the “state-approved” Catholic church bows to the government, while the Roman Catholic Church runs largely underground, where the Terrible, Traumatic, and Intolerable Name of Jesus Christ may still be uttered and cause knees to bend.

Fortunately the people of Connecticut utilized their right to “petition of Government for a redress of grievances” and this bill is now dead on arrival..

This should have never even gotten this far.

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