With the health care debate, ACORN, and other things that distract.  I completely missed this.  Erick Erickson of RedState posted on a vote that is huge, but most of us overlooked.

If you want an indication of just how radical the Democrats in Congress have become, consider the vote on H.R. 3221. The legislation, which I wrote about yesterday, shuts down all private lenders for higher education student loans, requires that colleges and universities adhere to a new federal bureaucracy, creates a new Green Schools Czar, and hints that any school not complying will see its students denied federal student loans.

Last year, Congress passed the Ensuring Continued Access to Student Loans Act (ECASLA). The bill passed in the House 388-21, including 221-0 among Democrats. The Senate passed it by unanimous consent. President Bush signed it. The legislation was a bi-partisan piece of legislation that allowed private sector involvement in student loans without a new federal bureaucracy.

This year, the Republican substitute to HR 3221 would extend ECASLA programs through 2014 and create a commission to develop a new private sector model for student lending. The amendment failed 165-265. 257 Democrats unanimously voted no.

Final passage of HR 3221 was 253-171. 4 Democrats voted no, 6 Republicans vote aye.

The Democrats have now rejected the same legislation they unanimously supported last year in favor of a new, expansive federal bureaucracy.

Time to get your Senator on the horn, and tell them to vote no on a further encroachment of Government. 

HT: Read My Lipstick Network

You May Also Like

School Choice Celebrated at Iowa State Capitol

School choice was touted at a rally on Wednesday at the Iowa State Capitol in light of several active bills that would expand educational freedom.

National Parent Coalition Sends Senate Questions for Betsy DeVos

A coalition of nearly 60 parent organizations, education experts and writers, and elected officials are concerned about Betsy Devos’ record and views.

Study: Common Core Violates Law, Unlikely to Improve Academic Achievement

A new Pioneer Institute research paper finds that the Common Core Standards that violate three federal laws are unlikely to improve student achievement.

To Sing or Not to Sing in Church, That is the Question for the Gilroy High School Choir

Choir practice in a church makes sense, unless it is the Gilroy…