image Many think they can live the Christian life on their own.  In their minds they believe they don’t need the Church.  British writer and apologist,C.S. Lewis (1898-1963), was much the same way after he placed his faith in Christ.  He wrote in his book, God In the Dock, what turned him around:

When I first became a Christian, about fourteen years ago, I thought that I could do it on my own, by retiring to my rooms and reading theology, and I wouldn’t go to the churches and Gospel Halls. . . .  I disliked very much their hymns, which I considered to be fifth-rate poems set to sixth-rate music.  But as I went on I saw the great merit in it.   I came up against different people of quite different outlooks and different education, and then gradually my conceit just began peeling off.   I realized that the hymns (which were just sixth-rate music) were, nevertheless, being sung with devotion and benefit by an old saint in elastic-side boots in the opposite pew, and then you realize that you aren’t fit to clean those boots.   It gets you out of your solitary conceit.

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