imageWashington D.C.- Congressman Steve King (R-IA) today issued the following statement in response to National Public Radio (NPR) terminating the contract of senior news analyst Juan Williams. NPR fired Williams shortly after an appearance on Fox News Channel’s “The O’Reilly Factor” in which Williams spoke candidly about the apprehension he feels while on airplanes with individuals dressed “in Muslim garb.”

“NPR fired Juan Williams for expressing something that is a visceral fear that most everyone feels when they get on an airplane,” said King. “However, Jesse Jackson remains in NPR’s good graces despite once saying ‘there is nothing more painful to me at this stage in my life than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery—then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved.’”

“Why does NPR apply one standard to Jesse Jackson and another standard to Juan Williams?”

Update: Linked by All American Blogger

10 comments
  1. Your congress must censure NPR for not being unbiased in its political approach. It would be hoped that alternate views would be expressed. The listeners must be the ones who decide and programs must not be filtered through politically correct sieves.

  2. I used to listen to NPR. But lately (even before Juan’s episode), I have got tired of their political correctness and pseudo-secularism. I don’t listen to it any more. 101.9 FM is more fun than 91.5.

    1. Pseudo-secularism. Feh. You’re a pseudo-letter-writer. For more than a generation, NPR has offered multiple points of view, yes, even conservative ones. It gets a bad rap as being overly liberal in its “point of view.” In fact, it is a straight-down-the-middle news source. Commentaries are the property of their creators. If you don’t understand that, you don’t understand what you’re writing about.

      The FUD that Fox News and Tea Party candidates make up — oh yes, they’d like to see NPR slashed — and the gullibility of so many Americans to believe them is indeed frightening.

  3. How can King presume “most everybody has a visceral fear” of people dressed in Muslim garb? Wrong. The bigger issue: Why can’t people like Williams and Jackson be allowed to say candidly what’s on their minds? I don’t know what NPR’s contracts require for its on-air employees, but it was definitely wrong in firing a respected journalist because he simply expressed an opinion. At worst, he’s guilty of stereotyping, and last time I looked, that wasn’t illegal.

  4. Rep. King is comparing apples to bananas, or else he’s just bananas himself. Rev. Jackson and Williams offer commentaries from different directions. Jackson is a guest commentator on NPR, Williams was a full-time paid staff commentator. Is NPR going to banish everybody who expresses a hot opinion on a topic? Give me a break.

    1. In both cases Jackson and Williams are offering “feelings” and not opinions. Totally different perspectives. You may feel a certain way and not be bigoted. You may not wish to feel a particular but you do and that doesn’t necessarily make you a bigoted person.

  5. NPR received a huge chunk of money from George Soros. He then probably told the CEO to get rid of Juan Williams,
    which she did. That’s how big money and dirty politics works. Does that surprise anyone?

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