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imageOn December 16th, executive committee members of the Pottawattamie County Republican Central Committee met to discuss the upcoming Iowa caucuses and the 2012 election cycle. Topping their list of priorities—defeating Democratic State Senator Mike Gronstal’s 2012 reelection bid.

The committee recognizes Senator Gronstal (D-Council Bluffs) as a major force in Iowa politics, and they realized the task to unseat him will be a huge challenge for Pottawattamie Republicans. However, the consensus among committee members was in this election cycle Senator Gronstal can be beaten.

According to Central Committee Chairman Jeff Jorgensen, “Senator Gronstal’s lack of respect for Iowa voters in addressing the gay marriage issue has damaged him politically and left him vulnerable to a successful Republican challenge in 2012. It will be our goal to find and support that Republican challenger. In the aftermath of the 2010 midterm elections, I am very confident that we can stamp a November 2012 expiration date on Mike Gronstal’s tenure as state senator from the 50th district.

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