(WASHINGTON, D.C).- Congressman Raúl Labrador of Idaho’s First Congressional District released the following statement in response to the United States Senate’s failure to pass a budget in 1,000 days, saying:

This Senate has spent 1,000 days without a budget and without a clue.

Instead of passing a budget, the Senate has passed Obamacare, preferential industry bailouts and failed stimulus packages— saddling American taxpayers with an additional $4 trillion in debt. Still, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and his Democratic colleagues seem uninterested in making meaningful cuts to save this country’s financial future. After all, if you don’t have a budget, why would you care about debt?

If Idaho families must live on budgets each and every day, why can’t the federal government? If Idaho families must make prudent choices and live within their means, why shouldn’t the federal government? If Idaho families must plan for their financial future, why doesn’t the federal government?

It’s time to put aside politics and put America first. I call on President Obama to use tonight’s platform of the State of the Union address to finally hold the U.S. Senate accountable for the utter disarray they’ve created for our fragile economy.

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