file000671519259How many law enforcement agencies does one government need?  Apparently a plethora as evidenced by an ammunition spending spree by agencies that don’t exactly seem like the type that would need the bullets.

It was originally reported that the National Weather Service purchased 45,000 bullets, but that report has been corrected.  It was actually the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for their Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement.

The NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement – what the heck is that?  It is described by NOAA as:

NOAA’s Office of Law Enforcement is dedicated to enforcing laws that conserve and protect our nation’s living marine resources and their natural habitat. Our goal is to assure that the many people who enjoy these resources for recreation or rely on them for business follow the rules that will maintain the species for future generations.

NOAA’s Office of Law Enforcement protects fish stocks from depletion and marine mammals from extinction. We also protect the livelihoods of commercial fishers, the hobbies of recreational fishers, and the health of seafood consumers.

Apparently they need a lot of bullets to protect those fish stocks and marine mammals.

Next the Social Security Administration had to explain their purchase of 174,000 hollow point bullets.

Yes these are the people who oversee a bankrupt retirement program and sends out the measly checks to senior citizens old enough to receive them.  Apparently they need their own law enforcement as well and the purchase of these bullets are “normal.”  Apparently things get pretty violent around there as they explained to CNSNews.com:

“Our special agents need to be armed and trained appropriately,” the blog post states.  “They not only investigate allegations of Social Security fraud, but they also are called to respond to threats against Social Security offices, employees, and customers.”

The blog also links to another post about a fight that broke out near an SSA office in Massachusetts that required action by law enforcement officials.

“SSA is processing more applications than ever, which means more traffic in SSA office,” the blog states. “Employee and visitor safety is the highest priority for OIG, which, together with the Federal Protective Services and local law enforcement, has jurisdiction over SSA workplaces.”

Like me I’m sure you feel much safer knowing these law enforcement agencies are on the job.

5 comments
  1. I know its odd that the pacifist is defending them buying bullets, but training with ones weapon takes bullets. Lots of them. Obviously they’re not shooting thousands of rounds into bad guys, but the social security department security guard needs to be as proficient with his gun as my dad, the detective, as does the fish and game warden. Is this article suggesting they don’t need bullets, or is this another where theres no clear stance, just clear implication?

    1. I agree that law enforcement agencies need bullets for training purposes.  What I’m subtly suggesting is why do these departments need law enforcement agencies.  There are so many overlapping agencies within the Federal government it is a nightmare.  Case in point when I was walking in DC, speaking of law enforcement, I saw the Secret Service, Uniformed Secret Service Police, FBI Police !?!?, Capitol Police, and U.S. Park Police – that was within 5 blocks. Now I understand these agencies have a clear function, except I don’t get why the FBI has a police force with marked vehicles it seems redundant.  But you also have ATF, U.S. Marshals, Dept. of Homeland Security Agents, Secret Service Counterfeit Division, Drug Enforcement Agency, ICE, Border Patrol, U.S. Postal Investigative Services, and probably numerous more I don’t even know about.  These two law enforcement agencies I didn’t even realize existed.  You’d think the FBI could handle the SSA stuff, and outsource security if it’s really needed.  NOAA, do they really need their own law enforcement?  No, surely there is some agency within the Department of the Interior that could cover that.

      1. These agencies spring up out of congressional acts.  Having dedicated law enforcement enforcing these programs makes sense from a variety of perspectives such as expertise, geographical deployment of resources and funding.  Also what’s wrong from a civil liberties perspective with with having  narrowly focused law enforcement agencies with limited jurisdiction?  Seems better than having one powerful national police force from that angle.

        Congress, rightly IMO,  passes laws making Social Security fraud and game poaching serious crimes punishable with long jail sentences.  Then, ill-informed bloggers act surprised when they discover specially trained police on the beat investigating these crimes and that they carry standard police equipment.

        Hollow-point pistol ammunition is standard in police departments nationwide.  The military uses fully-jacketed rounds mostly due to century old treaties on the laws of war.

        This is one big lame non-story which only illustrates the lack of knowledge people have of their government.

    2. My question is do they always train with hollow points? I’m ex military, not police, so for me its a bit odd – but I have always held the impression -perhaps erroneously – police used FMJ.

      1. Most law enforcement agencies use HP ammo because they don’t penetrate as deeply as ball ammo. So not only is your suspect more likely to go down, you’re also less likely to take out an innocent bystander behind him.

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