SD_Capitol
Under a new law in South Dakota the state will no longer allow access to law enforcement officers looking to identify the cars caught on speech cameras by the vehicle’s license plate number.

(Watchdog.org) Sioux City, IA – Sioux City’s Interstate 29 mobile speed cameras, which pumped $4.5 million into the city’s general operating budget last year, have just become less profitable.

Neighboring South Dakota will no longer provide Iowa or any other state with information that could be used “to impose or collect a civil fine that results from an alleged violation captured by a red light camera or speed camera.”

Although the law passed last week doesn’t mention them, Sioux City’s two interstate speed cameras inspired this change. People fined because of the cameras weren’t being treated fairly by Sioux City, according to South Dakota state Sen. Dan Lederman.

Lederman said residents of both South Dakota and Sioux City are fans of the new law.

“People are just fed up with these cameras,” Lederman said. “They place them between downtown Sioux City and the South Dakota border. More than 30,000 cars go back and forth through there every day.”

To collect fines, law enforcement officers identify the car by the vehicle’s license plate number. Under the new law, South Dakota will no longer grant access to that information.

“The way the city ordinance is written, it robs the defendant of the right to a fair trial,” Lederman, R-Dakota Dunes, told Iowa Watchdog. “Because it’s not about whoever was driving the car. The fine is imposed on whoever owns the vehicle instead.”

Lederman said the law is quite unpopular with the Sioux City mayor and police chief.

Sioux City Police Chief Dave Young has called the new law “a slap in the face of interstate cooperation between law enforcement agencies.”

“No comment,” was Mayor Bob Scott’s response when contacted about the new law.

Asked what effect this will have on Sioux City’s enforcement of its traffic laws, Lt. Mark Kilpatrick, media relations officer for the Sioux City Police Department, said, “The department is currently reviewing its options in order to decide how we are going to proceed now.”

“They’re just worried losing revenue,” Lederman said.

Photo credit: Jake DeGroot (CC-By-SA 3.0)

Get CT In Your Inbox!

Don't miss a single update.

You May Also Like

Reynolds Appoints Christopher Polking as District Court Judge

Gov. Kim Reynolds announced her appointment of Christopher Polking, 47, as a district court judge in Iowa Judicial District 2B to replace Judge Stephen Oeth.

The Sinclair Report: Common Sense Legislation to Protect Privacy

Amy Sinclair: Common sense bills need to be passed to protect our privacy when we are at home and other places we believe are safe from prying eyes.

Bob Vander Plaats Explains Why We Must Stop Judicial Activism

Below is a video from panel discussion held early this week debating…

Taxpayers Last

By State Senator Kent Sorenson The “Taxpayers First Act” (HF45) that passed…