Photo credit: Jason Schultz
Photo credit: Jason Schultz
Photo credit: Jason Schultz

Grassroots conservatives who opposed the rules passed last week by the Republican National Committee rules committee had the signatures needed have a floor vote on the rules during the first day of the convention, but that was thwarted by the Republican National Committee leadership.

Politico reports:

Chaos broke out at the Republican National Convention after Republican leaders blocked a full floor vote on the convention rules.

Critics of Donald Trump had attempted to force the vote and submitted the signatures they believed were necessary to do so, but after holding a voice vote on the rules, Rep. Steve Womack declared the rules approved and moved on.

Womack left the stage amid an uproar, only to return to the stage moments later for a second voice vote. He again declared that the ‘ayes’ had won, again to protests from the crowd.

Forcing a roll call vote requires support from the majorities of seven delegations. Anti-Trump delegates submitted what they said were a majority of signatures from at least 9: Colorado, Washington state, Utah, Minnesota, Wyoming, Maine, Iowa, Virginia and Washington, D.C. The also claimed that Alaska had provided signatures as well.

But Womack, after the second quote, claimed three states had withdrawn, against blocking a roll call vote.

This is bogus, name the three states that withdrew. They should have done a roll call vote period.

Some pertinent tweets.

https://twitter.com/kyliewalkerTV/status/755143121336348672

https://twitter.com/JGreenDC/status/755144017847943170

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