Jake Porter at a gubernatorial forum at Des Moines University in 2018.
Porter at a gubernatorial forum at Des Moines University.

While the Iowa Caucuses that happen in presidential election years get all of the media attention, it is held every two years, and even with the inclement weather Monday evening, Republican, Democrat, and Libertarian party faithful attended their caucuses held throughout the state.

The Libertarian Party of Iowa was the only party to include a straw poll for the 2018 gubernatorial race.

Jake Porter, a business consultant from Council Bluffs, defeated Marco Battaglia, a businessman from Des Moines. Porter, who was the Libertarian Party nominee for Iowa Secretary of State in 2010 and 2014 won 65 percent of the vote. Battaglia won 23 percent with 12 percent of caucus-goers saying they were uncommitted.

The straw poll is non-binding, the Libertarian nominee for Governor will be decided in the primary election on June 5th.

Iowa recognized the Libertarian Party of Iowa as a political party in 2016 after Gary Johnson received over 2% of the 2016 Presidential vote total in Iowa. This gives the party ballot access and allows the party to hold a primary election.

“I want to thank my supporters for voting for me in the first Libertarian caucus ever held in Iowa.  I am confident in our ability to win the June primary.”  Porter said.

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