The New York Times reports that Netflix’s Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos suggested that the company may boycott the state of Georgia over its fetal heartbeat abortion ban.

“We have many women working on productions in Georgia, whose rights, along with millions of others, will be severely restricted by this law. It’s why we will work with the A.C.L.U. and others to fight it in court. Given the legislation has not yet been implemented, we’ll continue to film there — while also supporting partners and artists who choose not to. Should it ever come into effect, we’d rethink our entire investment in Georgia,” he said in a released statement.

Axios‘ media reporter Sarah Fischer said, “Consumers expect brands to stand up for issues they believe in.”

Fischer cited a poll that says the opposite about Millennials believe about brands when it comes to politics, a plurality, if not a majority, are ok with neutrality. Also, Millennials are not the only consumers that brands should care about.

I’m in that boat. Bring on neutrality. I do not give a flying fig what Ted Sarandos and Netflix leadership privately believe about abortion. I want to binge watch my favorite TV shows in peace. They can personally support and donate to pro-abortion causes if they like, knock themselves out, that is their right.

Boycotting cities and states because of abortion bans or bathroom bills is disrespectful of their consumers and shareholders. If Netflix goes through with this I can unequivocally say, I’m done.

I think that Georgians and pro-life advocates canceling their Netflix subscriptions can do Netflix far more harm than Netflix boycotting Georgia.

I don’t care if a company is neutral on an issue I care about, but I do care when they work against me.

From what I’ve seen, it is generally people on the left who push for this. Most of us the right expect neutrality. Sure we may cheer a company or brand taking a particular stand on an issue, but that’s a far cry from expecting them to do that.

For instance, no one called on Chick-fil-A to boycott states that allowed same-sex marriage pre-Obergefell. Even if someone did, they would not do that because it does not make good business sense. Could you imagine the response if they did something like that? Chick-fil-A, contrary to what leftists say and the media dutifully report, does not engage in political activity. The Cathy Family made private donations to groups that opposed same-sex marriage, but that is not the same as the company doing it.

Christians and conservatives care about corporate activism, but generally from a perspective of companies supporting and donating to causes we do not support. Also, Christian and conservative business owners generally do not engage their businesses into the political realm unless it is an issue of forcing the owners to violate their religious conscience.

In most cases, neutrality is best, and that is what we expect. I don’t want to inject politics into my food, clothes, tv binge-watching, or sports (among other things). I wish Netflix, and companies like them would understand that’s where most Americans want. I don’t watch Netflix because of their role in the culture war.

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