gun on black metal background
Photo Credit: Pixabay

According to The Washington Post, the number of people killed in mass shootings since the mid-sixties is a little over a thousand. The approximate ratio of that number to the US population is .000003. That’s three-millionths of the total population. Three millionths.

So, USA, get this through your head:

1. Mass shooting is not “what America has become.”

That’s absurd. Mass shootings are mind-numbingly rare. The only reason they seem commonplace is that they are all over the news 24/7. It’s an illusion. There is no gun crisis. How many times do you hear the following coming from your favorite news channel? “Millions upon millions of people drove to work and came home again safely without incident today all over the country.

Thousands of commercial flights landed in utter safety in major airports in major cities all over the nation repeatedly day in and day out over the last few decades. Millions of children got through their school day in devastating safety and were not shot or harmed in any way over the last fifty years. Don’t miss our special report at the top of the hour.”

Why do we hear about the major tragedies on the news? Because they are insanely rare. Think about it: If they were commonplace like we are led to believe, they wouldn’t be newsworthy and we wouldn’t hear about each one. A real mass shooting/gun crisis would be hundreds of thousands of people being mowed down all over the landscape on a daily basis. It ain’t so. Mass shootings on that scale are what you get from the government when you abolish the individual’s right to bear arms.

Is gun violence more common in certain concentrated areas/cities in our nation than others? Yes. Does that mean there is a “gun crisis?” No.

2. Everyone wants to figure out how to prevent “mass shootings.”

Listen carefully: YOU CAN’T. Get it? YOU. CAN’T. We live in a fallen world. We can take measures that may decrease the chances of these happening, but they will never reduce the chances to zero. NEVER. Accept it.

3. Stop the “our politicians have to do something” stupidity.

The government has already enacted numerous laws against gun violence. More laws will change precisely NOTHING. 

N O T H I N G.

4. Dear high school kids: enough of the “stop killing us” nonsense.

You’re not being murdered on a massive scale. Your chances, oh high school student, of being killed in a mass shooting before you graduate are about ONE in 200 BILLION. I’m not exaggerating. You have a far, far better chance of getting hit by lightning twice in your lifetime (1 in 9 million), or being the victim of a shark attack (1 in 3.7 million). Are you learning anything in school? If you still don’t have the intelligence to avoid falling for this school shooting crisis lunacy, you should probably look for a better school.

We can grieve together over the latest tragedies. The Bible says “weep with those who weep.” 

But it also says “you shall not lie.” The “gun problem” and “mass shooting crisis” narratives are lies designed to increase ratings, and to emotionally manipulate a gullible audience into endorsing a totalitarian gun control agenda. That’s all. 

Stop with the gun crisis hysteria already. You live in the safest place on earth, and that level of safety is damn near miraculous.

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