Photo credit: Gage Skidmore (CC-By-2.0)

Not long ago, U.S. Senator Mitt Romney, R- Utah, said that “We need to stand up and say that black lives matter.”

If we take that to mean that black men, women, and children’s lives are valuable and important, few of any race would disagree with the Senator. The problem is that the Senator also marched in a protest organized by Black Lives Matter, which appears to be a radical Marxist movement at its organizational core.

This action suggests that the Senator intended something more by his words than merely that black lives are valuable and important. No surprise there. The Senator is a gifted panderer.

But whatever Romney’s intent, it seems that it’s nearly impossible at present to distinguish between “black lives matter,” the conviction, and “Black Lives Matter,” the political movement.

This problem leaves many of us frustrated when we attempt to express our concern for black people on the one hand and distance ourselves from BLM on the other. Regrettably, in a world that no longer has a place for such nuance, for many of us, the best course of action has been to remain silent.

This is Brian Myers with your Caffeinated Thought Of The Week.

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