Following up on my last post based on my reading of Why We’re Not Emergent (By Two Guys Who Should Be), Kevin DeYoung wonders are the pilgrims making any progress?  Emergents talk much about being on a journey.  How is this different than the old notion of a spiritual pilgrimage?  DeYoung writes:

The old notion of spiritual pilgrimage used the idea of journey to symbolize our longing for heaven and our place as strangers in the kingdom of this world.  As sojourners and exiles, Christians were called to abstain from lusts of the flesh, “which war against (our) soul,” and to “live such good lives among the pagans that…” they “see (our) good deeds and glorify God on the day he visits us,” (1 Peter 2:11-12, NIV).  We are supposed to be living in faith, looking forward to a better country, that is, a heavenly one (Heb. 11:16).  The journey of the Christian life was the way of the pilgrim fighting against fears and doubts, trying not to be squeezed into this world’s mold, trusting that God has something better for us, even if we had not yet received what was promised (see Heb. 11:39-40).

In much of emergent thought, however, the destination is a secondary matter, as is any concern about being on the right path.  “Evangelism,” therefore, “should be seen as an opportunity to ‘fund’ people’s spiritual journeys, drawing on the highly relevant resources of ‘little pieces’ of truth contained in the Christian narrative,” (Dave Tomlinson – The Post-Evangelical).  Similarly, Peter Rollins argues that instead of thinking in terms of destination (we become Christians, joined a church, are saved), we should think in terms of journey (we are becoming Christians, becoming church, becoming saved).  Hence, we “need to be evangelized as much, if not more than those around us,” (from How (Not) To Speak of God by Peter Rollins).

I’m ok with the terminology of journey as it applies to our ongoing development towards Christ-likeness.  The Apostle Paul likens our life in Christ in terms of journey as well:

Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own.  Brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own. But one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead,  I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.  Let those of us who are mature think this way, and if in anything you think otherwise, God will reveal that also to you, (Philippians 3:12-15, ESV).

The clear difference here is that Paul had a destination in mind!  That seems fuzzy at best with emergent thought.  I’m also concerned with their view of evangelism.  It seems to me that with the position that Tomlinson (what exactly does it mean to “fund” a spiritual journey anyway?) and with Rollins (we have to evangelize Christians?  Encourage, yes.  Disciple, yes.  Exhort and rebuke on occasion, but evangelize?) that there is a decidedly de-emphasis on the Great Commission to make disciples, (Matthew 28:19-20).  What do you think? 

60 comments
  1. Thought provoking Shane.. got me looking for my copy of “the post evangelical”.. here is a snippet from page 87..

    “In the past, evangelicals have sought to transform people by presenting the gospel within a whole, fixed, doctrinal, moral scheme expressed within a definite cultural form.”

    Tomlinson goes on to contrast the difference using two models of furniture.. one already assembled and one that you have to assemble. He says that it is not necessary to present the fully assembled piece of furniture but to present pieces of it.

    Not sure that I have accurately relayed the story but I think that the idea is that evangelism comes in pieces not in one shot. Maybe that is what it means when we read that one plants, one waters and one reaps?

    I have not read “Why We’re Not Emergent” but it sounds like the authors are folks who are not comfortable with unanswered and unanswerable questions. If your focus is on answers I think that you will most like be uncomfortable with “journey talk” because it is not all that important to you.. for them it is not important how you arrived at the answer.. only that you got the right answer.

    Again, I may not be understanding the issue here.. I haven’t finished my first cup of joe yet 🙂

  2. Thought provoking Shane.. got me looking for my copy of “the post evangelical”.. here is a snippet from page 87..

    “In the past, evangelicals have sought to transform people by presenting the gospel within a whole, fixed, doctrinal, moral scheme expressed within a definite cultural form.”

    Tomlinson goes on to contrast the difference using two models of furniture.. one already assembled and one that you have to assemble. He says that it is not necessary to present the fully assembled piece of furniture but to present pieces of it.

    Not sure that I have accurately relayed the story but I think that the idea is that evangelism comes in pieces not in one shot. Maybe that is what it means when we read that one plants, one waters and one reaps?

    I have not read “Why We’re Not Emergent” but it sounds like the authors are folks who are not comfortable with unanswered and unanswerable questions. If your focus is on answers I think that you will most like be uncomfortable with “journey talk” because it is not all that important to you.. for them it is not important how you arrived at the answer.. only that you got the right answer.

    Again, I may not be understanding the issue here.. I haven’t finished my first cup of joe yet 🙂

  3. Thought provoking Shane.. got me looking for my copy of “the post evangelical”.. here is a snippet from page 87..

    “In the past, evangelicals have sought to transform people by presenting the gospel within a whole, fixed, doctrinal, moral scheme expressed within a definite cultural form.”

    Tomlinson goes on to contrast the difference using two models of furniture.. one already assembled and one that you have to assemble. He says that it is not necessary to present the fully assembled piece of furniture but to present pieces of it.

    Not sure that I have accurately relayed the story but I think that the idea is that evangelism comes in pieces not in one shot. Maybe that is what it means when we read that one plants, one waters and one reaps?

    I have not read “Why We’re Not Emergent” but it sounds like the authors are folks who are not comfortable with unanswered and unanswerable questions. If your focus is on answers I think that you will most like be uncomfortable with “journey talk” because it is not all that important to you.. for them it is not important how you arrived at the answer.. only that you got the right answer.

    Again, I may not be understanding the issue here.. I haven’t finished my first cup of joe yet 🙂

  4. well, the way i am seeing it here from the mission field, is that emerging church people coming over on mission trips to help fulfil the Great Commsission are more likely to see their trip as a spiritual pilgrimage – and the journey is as important as the destination, or even more important because they go home eventuually with a differnt outlook on things which changes the way they do ministry in their home town,

    maybe missions itself is resembling pilgrimage?

  5. well, the way i am seeing it here from the mission field, is that emerging church people coming over on mission trips to help fulfil the Great Commsission are more likely to see their trip as a spiritual pilgrimage – and the journey is as important as the destination, or even more important because they go home eventuually with a differnt outlook on things which changes the way they do ministry in their home town,

    maybe missions itself is resembling pilgrimage?

  6. well, the way i am seeing it here from the mission field, is that emerging church people coming over on mission trips to help fulfil the Great Commsission are more likely to see their trip as a spiritual pilgrimage – and the journey is as important as the destination, or even more important because they go home eventuually with a differnt outlook on things which changes the way they do ministry in their home town,

    maybe missions itself is resembling pilgrimage?

  7. I found the context for the excerpt from “the post evangelical” on page 138.. I think that when it speaks to funding people’s spiritual journeys it is simply saying stating the need for us to recognized that God has been at work in a non-Christians life and conversion is another part in their life’s journey.

    Again.. I may not be communicating their idea effectively.. but I think that acknowledging a person’s journey and helping them see God in it is not an irrelevant part of the conversion process.

  8. I found the context for the excerpt from “the post evangelical” on page 138.. I think that when it speaks to funding people’s spiritual journeys it is simply saying stating the need for us to recognized that God has been at work in a non-Christians life and conversion is another part in their life’s journey.

    Again.. I may not be communicating their idea effectively.. but I think that acknowledging a person’s journey and helping them see God in it is not an irrelevant part of the conversion process.

  9. I found the context for the excerpt from “the post evangelical” on page 138.. I think that when it speaks to funding people’s spiritual journeys it is simply saying stating the need for us to recognized that God has been at work in a non-Christians life and conversion is another part in their life’s journey.

    Again.. I may not be communicating their idea effectively.. but I think that acknowledging a person’s journey and helping them see God in it is not an irrelevant part of the conversion process.

  10. @Kansas Bob – I recognize that nonbelievers are on a “journey” I mean that was part of my own experience. That is why we often call them “seekers.”

    What I am uncomfortable with is that there never seems to be answers with some (not all) of these guys. We can know God. We can know truth. Not everything is a mystery. I think this will be my next blog post on the subject.

    @Andrew – thanks for stopping by! That is an interesting point you bring up. I think that’s legitimate. I’m not so sure it speaks to the heart of what is bothering me though. I enjoy your blog, but I’ve been mostly a lurker I’ll have to comment more.

  11. @Kansas Bob – I recognize that nonbelievers are on a “journey” I mean that was part of my own experience. That is why we often call them “seekers.”

    What I am uncomfortable with is that there never seems to be answers with some (not all) of these guys. We can know God. We can know truth. Not everything is a mystery. I think this will be my next blog post on the subject.

    @Andrew – thanks for stopping by! That is an interesting point you bring up. I think that’s legitimate. I’m not so sure it speaks to the heart of what is bothering me though. I enjoy your blog, but I’ve been mostly a lurker I’ll have to comment more.

  12. @Kansas Bob – I recognize that nonbelievers are on a “journey” I mean that was part of my own experience. That is why we often call them “seekers.”

    What I am uncomfortable with is that there never seems to be answers with some (not all) of these guys. We can know God. We can know truth. Not everything is a mystery. I think this will be my next blog post on the subject.

    @Andrew – thanks for stopping by! That is an interesting point you bring up. I think that’s legitimate. I’m not so sure it speaks to the heart of what is bothering me though. I enjoy your blog, but I’ve been mostly a lurker I’ll have to comment more.

  13. “I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life”. 1 John 3:15 NIV

    “Now this is eternal life: that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.” John 17:3 NIV

    I think most of us would admit that there are unanswered and unanswerable questions in relation to our faith. I think that is hardly debatable. In fact, Scripture is explicit on this point: “Now we see but a poor reflection; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.” 1 Cor. 13:12 NIV

    But as the first two verses point out, there is plenty that we can know and must know for sure.

    I’m not uncomfortable with questions. I think a lot of us are just fine with them. You seem to keep coming back to that point, Bob.

    What I think we should be concerned about is all the nebulousness that points to perpetual uncertainty.

    I read “Why we’re not Emergent”, and the authors are both young guys who are quite comfortable with asking questions and deconstructing assumptions, but they stand firm on that which must be firm. This is where Emergent people fail badly.

  14. “I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life”. 1 John 3:15 NIV

    “Now this is eternal life: that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.” John 17:3 NIV

    I think most of us would admit that there are unanswered and unanswerable questions in relation to our faith. I think that is hardly debatable. In fact, Scripture is explicit on this point: “Now we see but a poor reflection; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.” 1 Cor. 13:12 NIV

    But as the first two verses point out, there is plenty that we can know and must know for sure.

    I’m not uncomfortable with questions. I think a lot of us are just fine with them. You seem to keep coming back to that point, Bob.

    What I think we should be concerned about is all the nebulousness that points to perpetual uncertainty.

    I read “Why we’re not Emergent”, and the authors are both young guys who are quite comfortable with asking questions and deconstructing assumptions, but they stand firm on that which must be firm. This is where Emergent people fail badly.

  15. “I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life”. 1 John 3:15 NIV

    “Now this is eternal life: that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.” John 17:3 NIV

    I think most of us would admit that there are unanswered and unanswerable questions in relation to our faith. I think that is hardly debatable. In fact, Scripture is explicit on this point: “Now we see but a poor reflection; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.” 1 Cor. 13:12 NIV

    But as the first two verses point out, there is plenty that we can know and must know for sure.

    I’m not uncomfortable with questions. I think a lot of us are just fine with them. You seem to keep coming back to that point, Bob.

    What I think we should be concerned about is all the nebulousness that points to perpetual uncertainty.

    I read “Why we’re not Emergent”, and the authors are both young guys who are quite comfortable with asking questions and deconstructing assumptions, but they stand firm on that which must be firm. This is where Emergent people fail badly.

  16. Thanks Steve.. I’m not uncomfortable with questions either.. although I once was 🙂

    Maybe you or Shane can provide one example of “they stand firm on that which must be firm. This is where Emergent people fail badly.”

    It would be helpful to be specific. I think that I addressed the Tomlinson reference in specific.. so I think that I am missing something.. or just being my usual clueless self 🙂

  17. Thanks Steve.. I’m not uncomfortable with questions either.. although I once was 🙂

    Maybe you or Shane can provide one example of “they stand firm on that which must be firm. This is where Emergent people fail badly.”

    It would be helpful to be specific. I think that I addressed the Tomlinson reference in specific.. so I think that I am missing something.. or just being my usual clueless self 🙂

  18. Thanks Steve.. I’m not uncomfortable with questions either.. although I once was 🙂

    Maybe you or Shane can provide one example of “they stand firm on that which must be firm. This is where Emergent people fail badly.”

    It would be helpful to be specific. I think that I addressed the Tomlinson reference in specific.. so I think that I am missing something.. or just being my usual clueless self 🙂

  19. Hey, Bob

    I didn’t so much think that you were uncomfortable with questions as that you think that orthodox Evangelicals are. I could totally be reading you wrong… (a common problem with electronic communication!)

    Are you asking for a specific example of the authors of “Why We’re Not Emergent” standing firm? Or are you asking for a specific example of the larger Evangelical world?

  20. Hey, Bob

    I didn’t so much think that you were uncomfortable with questions as that you think that orthodox Evangelicals are. I could totally be reading you wrong… (a common problem with electronic communication!)

    Are you asking for a specific example of the authors of “Why We’re Not Emergent” standing firm? Or are you asking for a specific example of the larger Evangelical world?

  21. Hey, Bob

    I didn’t so much think that you were uncomfortable with questions as that you think that orthodox Evangelicals are. I could totally be reading you wrong… (a common problem with electronic communication!)

    Are you asking for a specific example of the authors of “Why We’re Not Emergent” standing firm? Or are you asking for a specific example of the larger Evangelical world?

  22. Here is an excerpt from Shane’s post that some more specifics might help with..

    “What I am uncomfortable with is that there never seems to be answers with some (not all) of these guys.”

    .. from most of what I read so far it seems that the questions are about an inspecificity concerning spiritual destination.. am I missing something? Is the concern that some of these folks don’t believe that Jesus is the way?

    Maybe I am just not familiar enough with emergent thinkings and writings?

  23. Here is an excerpt from Shane’s post that some more specifics might help with..

    “What I am uncomfortable with is that there never seems to be answers with some (not all) of these guys.”

    .. from most of what I read so far it seems that the questions are about an inspecificity concerning spiritual destination.. am I missing something? Is the concern that some of these folks don’t believe that Jesus is the way?

    Maybe I am just not familiar enough with emergent thinkings and writings?

  24. Here is an excerpt from Shane’s post that some more specifics might help with..

    “What I am uncomfortable with is that there never seems to be answers with some (not all) of these guys.”

    .. from most of what I read so far it seems that the questions are about an inspecificity concerning spiritual destination.. am I missing something? Is the concern that some of these folks don’t believe that Jesus is the way?

    Maybe I am just not familiar enough with emergent thinkings and writings?

  25. It might pay you to go to Emergent Village’s website.

    Part of the process that Emergents have used to, I guess, see things from a postmodern perspective is to deconstruct all of historical Christianity.

    I don’t have a problem with that, per se. I think it is good for each generation to ask the Big Questions afresh, but I would give this caveat: Let the questioning be guided by the concept of truth.

    This is where I part ways with most Emergent guys. Their concept of truth is fuzzy. It’s as if they have become postmodern in an effort to reach postmoderns.

    So despite the fact that they are “not comfortable” with conclusions, they actually come to some rather outrageous ones, as I have mentioned before.

    So things like hell and the atonement and the cross and the resurrection and sin are being questioned, but the conclusion is to kind of minimize all those things in favor of “living like Jesus”, which appears to be more important.

    Things like justification become very nebulous, and who is in the darkness and who is in the light almost become non-issues.

    Those are incredibly important concepts, and to ask questions in a way that leads to false conclusions (“we just can’t know” or “it’s really not that important”) is profoundly irresponsible.

    I don’t know if that clears up what I’m saying or not…

  26. It might pay you to go to Emergent Village’s website.

    Part of the process that Emergents have used to, I guess, see things from a postmodern perspective is to deconstruct all of historical Christianity.

    I don’t have a problem with that, per se. I think it is good for each generation to ask the Big Questions afresh, but I would give this caveat: Let the questioning be guided by the concept of truth.

    This is where I part ways with most Emergent guys. Their concept of truth is fuzzy. It’s as if they have become postmodern in an effort to reach postmoderns.

    So despite the fact that they are “not comfortable” with conclusions, they actually come to some rather outrageous ones, as I have mentioned before.

    So things like hell and the atonement and the cross and the resurrection and sin are being questioned, but the conclusion is to kind of minimize all those things in favor of “living like Jesus”, which appears to be more important.

    Things like justification become very nebulous, and who is in the darkness and who is in the light almost become non-issues.

    Those are incredibly important concepts, and to ask questions in a way that leads to false conclusions (“we just can’t know” or “it’s really not that important”) is profoundly irresponsible.

    I don’t know if that clears up what I’m saying or not…

  27. It might pay you to go to Emergent Village’s website.

    Part of the process that Emergents have used to, I guess, see things from a postmodern perspective is to deconstruct all of historical Christianity.

    I don’t have a problem with that, per se. I think it is good for each generation to ask the Big Questions afresh, but I would give this caveat: Let the questioning be guided by the concept of truth.

    This is where I part ways with most Emergent guys. Their concept of truth is fuzzy. It’s as if they have become postmodern in an effort to reach postmoderns.

    So despite the fact that they are “not comfortable” with conclusions, they actually come to some rather outrageous ones, as I have mentioned before.

    So things like hell and the atonement and the cross and the resurrection and sin are being questioned, but the conclusion is to kind of minimize all those things in favor of “living like Jesus”, which appears to be more important.

    Things like justification become very nebulous, and who is in the darkness and who is in the light almost become non-issues.

    Those are incredibly important concepts, and to ask questions in a way that leads to false conclusions (“we just can’t know” or “it’s really not that important”) is profoundly irresponsible.

    I don’t know if that clears up what I’m saying or not…

  28. Thanks Steve. Your comment helped bring bit of focus. The only book mentioned that I have actually read is Tomlinson’s “the post evangelical”.. didn’t find it to be aberrant theology wise.. possibly I was reacting to that.

    Look forward to Shane’s next posting about the truth that we can know.. hope the word ‘rapture’ isn’t mentioned in it 🙂

  29. Thanks Steve. Your comment helped bring bit of focus. The only book mentioned that I have actually read is Tomlinson’s “the post evangelical”.. didn’t find it to be aberrant theology wise.. possibly I was reacting to that.

    Look forward to Shane’s next posting about the truth that we can know.. hope the word ‘rapture’ isn’t mentioned in it 🙂

  30. Thanks Steve. Your comment helped bring bit of focus. The only book mentioned that I have actually read is Tomlinson’s “the post evangelical”.. didn’t find it to be aberrant theology wise.. possibly I was reacting to that.

    Look forward to Shane’s next posting about the truth that we can know.. hope the word ‘rapture’ isn’t mentioned in it 🙂

  31. Bob – I promise I will not bring up the word rapture! LOL… I’ve been enjoying the back and forth between you and Steve.

    I’m with Steve that their is a tendency to deconstruct everything. What I find funny is when they say that we have mixed Christianity with modern culture – they are doing the exact same thing with postmodernism.

    Some specifics (and I’m not referring to Tomlinson’s book since they only reason I brought it up was be fact DeYoung did in the passage I quoted) – a view that truth is not something we can know with any degree of certainty, atonement, salvation, inerrancy of Scripture, etc. Just to name a few things – and I do want to point out that not every person tied into the emerging church has gone off the deep end theologically – it is mainly the Emergent Village crowd that has.

  32. Bob – I promise I will not bring up the word rapture! LOL… I’ve been enjoying the back and forth between you and Steve.

    I’m with Steve that their is a tendency to deconstruct everything. What I find funny is when they say that we have mixed Christianity with modern culture – they are doing the exact same thing with postmodernism.

    Some specifics (and I’m not referring to Tomlinson’s book since they only reason I brought it up was be fact DeYoung did in the passage I quoted) – a view that truth is not something we can know with any degree of certainty, atonement, salvation, inerrancy of Scripture, etc. Just to name a few things – and I do want to point out that not every person tied into the emerging church has gone off the deep end theologically – it is mainly the Emergent Village crowd that has.

  33. Bob – I promise I will not bring up the word rapture! LOL… I’ve been enjoying the back and forth between you and Steve.

    I’m with Steve that their is a tendency to deconstruct everything. What I find funny is when they say that we have mixed Christianity with modern culture – they are doing the exact same thing with postmodernism.

    Some specifics (and I’m not referring to Tomlinson’s book since they only reason I brought it up was be fact DeYoung did in the passage I quoted) – a view that truth is not something we can know with any degree of certainty, atonement, salvation, inerrancy of Scripture, etc. Just to name a few things – and I do want to point out that not every person tied into the emerging church has gone off the deep end theologically – it is mainly the Emergent Village crowd that has.

  34. A great specific example of Emergent Village guys going off the deep end is Tony Jones’ rant about Young Life and their list of non-negotiables that happened some time ago.

    Jones redefines (or “reimagines”) all the key ideas in the gospel. It’s unbeleivable.

    The post is not as helpful without reading the comments – of which ther are over 50. Very much worth it though. This way you can actually see what these guys are saying themselves, rather than what their critics are saying about them.

    Have fun! :0)

    http://tonyj.net/2008/01/08/something-is-wrong-at-young-life/

  35. A great specific example of Emergent Village guys going off the deep end is Tony Jones’ rant about Young Life and their list of non-negotiables that happened some time ago.

    Jones redefines (or “reimagines”) all the key ideas in the gospel. It’s unbeleivable.

    The post is not as helpful without reading the comments – of which ther are over 50. Very much worth it though. This way you can actually see what these guys are saying themselves, rather than what their critics are saying about them.

    Have fun! :0)

    http://tonyj.net/2008/01/08/something-is-wrong-at-young-life/

  36. A great specific example of Emergent Village guys going off the deep end is Tony Jones’ rant about Young Life and their list of non-negotiables that happened some time ago.

    Jones redefines (or “reimagines”) all the key ideas in the gospel. It’s unbeleivable.

    The post is not as helpful without reading the comments – of which ther are over 50. Very much worth it though. This way you can actually see what these guys are saying themselves, rather than what their critics are saying about them.

    Have fun! :0)

    http://tonyj.net/2008/01/08/something-is-wrong-at-young-life/

  37. I had not read the Tony Jones piece before and skimmed it over as well as the Christian Century and Christianity Today articles. Maybe we can discuss the nonnegotiables some time and I can get your take on it Shane from a youth worker perspective.

    For me I might be concerned if YL went the way of the formulaic 4 spiritual laws.. but maybe not?

  38. I had not read the Tony Jones piece before and skimmed it over as well as the Christian Century and Christianity Today articles. Maybe we can discuss the nonnegotiables some time and I can get your take on it Shane from a youth worker perspective.

    For me I might be concerned if YL went the way of the formulaic 4 spiritual laws.. but maybe not?

  39. I had not read the Tony Jones piece before and skimmed it over as well as the Christian Century and Christianity Today articles. Maybe we can discuss the nonnegotiables some time and I can get your take on it Shane from a youth worker perspective.

    For me I might be concerned if YL went the way of the formulaic 4 spiritual laws.. but maybe not?

  40. A legitimate beef that the Emergent guys have is that Evangelicals have reduced the glory of salvation down to four laws and a prayer: “Follow this simple formula, say these words, and you go the Heaven when you die. Isn’t that wonderful?”

    I have a beef with that too. It’s bumper-sticker theology.

    But their answer is to make things even worse. They gut the gospel and turn it into this nebulous journey. There is no distinction between the lost and the saved, and things like sin, wrath, blood and hell are either minimized or chucked altogether.

    We’re in trouble, brothers.

  41. A legitimate beef that the Emergent guys have is that Evangelicals have reduced the glory of salvation down to four laws and a prayer: “Follow this simple formula, say these words, and you go the Heaven when you die. Isn’t that wonderful?”

    I have a beef with that too. It’s bumper-sticker theology.

    But their answer is to make things even worse. They gut the gospel and turn it into this nebulous journey. There is no distinction between the lost and the saved, and things like sin, wrath, blood and hell are either minimized or chucked altogether.

    We’re in trouble, brothers.

  42. A legitimate beef that the Emergent guys have is that Evangelicals have reduced the glory of salvation down to four laws and a prayer: “Follow this simple formula, say these words, and you go the Heaven when you die. Isn’t that wonderful?”

    I have a beef with that too. It’s bumper-sticker theology.

    But their answer is to make things even worse. They gut the gospel and turn it into this nebulous journey. There is no distinction between the lost and the saved, and things like sin, wrath, blood and hell are either minimized or chucked altogether.

    We’re in trouble, brothers.

  43. “There is no distinction between the lost and the saved”

    ..I think I know some saved folks like that Steve.. just joshing.. but I do know some of them 🙂

  44. “There is no distinction between the lost and the saved”

    ..I think I know some saved folks like that Steve.. just joshing.. but I do know some of them 🙂

  45. “There is no distinction between the lost and the saved”

    ..I think I know some saved folks like that Steve.. just joshing.. but I do know some of them 🙂

  46. No argument there!

    Tares and wheat, man. Hardest part of a pastor’s job is trying to get lost people to act like saved people. Perhaps we should be a little clearer on the cost of following Jesus, eh?

    But at least we acknowledge that there is indeed a difference!

  47. No argument there!

    Tares and wheat, man. Hardest part of a pastor’s job is trying to get lost people to act like saved people. Perhaps we should be a little clearer on the cost of following Jesus, eh?

    But at least we acknowledge that there is indeed a difference!

  48. No argument there!

    Tares and wheat, man. Hardest part of a pastor’s job is trying to get lost people to act like saved people. Perhaps we should be a little clearer on the cost of following Jesus, eh?

    But at least we acknowledge that there is indeed a difference!

  49. I just feel that if it is only about the journey, it would be about me; but if it is about the destination, it will be about Him.

    I feel if it is about me, I may have made a journey but missed the boat.

    AndyCs last blog post..A Bacon Driven Life

  50. I just feel that if it is only about the journey, it would be about me; but if it is about the destination, it will be about Him.

    I feel if it is about me, I may have made a journey but missed the boat.

    AndyCs last blog post..A Bacon Driven Life

  51. I just feel that if it is only about the journey, it would be about me; but if it is about the destination, it will be about Him.

    I feel if it is about me, I may have made a journey but missed the boat.

    AndyCs last blog post..A Bacon Driven Life

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Podcast: God is Holy

God is holy, but what does that mean for us in our…

Regrets

What is it that you regret? HT: G-Man I can relate to…

The Gospel Was Rediscovered 500 Years Ago

Shane Vander Hart: The Reformers rediscovered the Gospel, and we must keep it the center of our churches, our families, our worship, and our lives.