Kevin DeYoung and Ted Kluck, co-authorrs of Why We’re Not Emergent by Two Guys Who Should Be, recently wrote another book (haven’t read it yet) called Why We Love The Church: In Praise of Institutions and Organized ReligionSteve had posted the following video promoting the book.

I’m not saying that local churches don’t have problems, but here are some reasons why I love the church:

  • Jesus loves His Church.
  • It is the Bride of Christ and the Body of Christ.
  • It is a place where I can go to be encouraged, edified, taught and serve.
  • Somewhere I can utilize my gifts in order to build-up the body.
  • Where else can I accomplish the “one another” commands in epistles?  (There are 33).
  • A place where I can go to hear the sound teaching of the word and participate in the ordinances of the church which Jesus commands us to do.
  • A place where I can experience corporate worship.

How about you?

10 comments
  1. What I appreciate about the church is its ability to create community – and that’s a great thing in a very individualized society…offers an acceptance that is very lacking for some people (most people I would say). I also love debating the scriptures so I love theology and those talks within the church. The community service can also be quite great!
    .-= Societyvs´s last blog ..Define Idolatry… =-.

  2. Thanks for the tip I will have to check out the book. I whole-heartedly agree with your bullet points above. As someone who considers himself fairly reformed in theology I appreciate the importance and sanctity of the church that Christ instituted/launched (not that one necessarily begets the other). On the other hand, I also think that the “church” (or rather system of church) that men have defined over several hundred years leaves a lot to be desired. I have almost come to the place of eliminating this word from my vocabulary substituted for more descriptive terms to better communicate what I am saying or more importantly what I am NOT saying. I think the ambiguity that has developed around the modern word “church” has been a large source of headache and misunderstanding. I have enjoyed some of the critical analysis in Frank Viola’s writings on the topic.

  3. I am an emergent, and I love the church… love it very deeply.

    what I hate is hyped up denominationalism. The beliefs that we all must believe across every state and contry exact doctrine on a subject. That does not sit well. Culutres vary city to city, state to state. Churches can, do and must exist in these communities in a culturally relevant fashion. To dig in the trenches and say we must believe and be of one accord and call ourselves XYZ about doctine that does not deal with the core of the faith is bologna. It is fear and fear is idolatry and that is sinful that drives that. The fact that we can not have distinctive voices and call ourselves XYZ church still really bites, and it is not pleasing to God.

    All the church seems to be doing (I know this is a broad indictment so dont excortiate me about this) is deciding how to handle big issues, getting divided and looking like monkeys. All they do is dig the trench deeper and make the pain greater.

    I love the church, my independent God fearing, God loving, life changing LOCAL church. We learn from Christ, want to be more like him, and we just cant find in scripture where God said go out and start a church and then divide it myrads of times over again.

    1. @Carl Holmes, I can buy what you are saying… but I think in your statement that you dismiss everytime a denomination was started and done so with good cause.

      Like the Reformation… like with Free Churches in Sweden & Norway broke from the State Church when they abandoned the truth, etc.

      Who decides what is the core of doctrine? I mean that line is getting blurred… inspiration & inerrancy of Scripture? The Virgin Birth? The Nature and purpose of the Atonement? See what I’m saying?

      Not to say some churches haven’t divided over silly & petty things.
      .-= Shane Vander Hart´s last blog ..Latte Links (7/31) =-.

      1. @Shane Vander Hart, now, I don’t know much about this Emergent church, but my understanding is that they deviate from mainstream Protestantism in the sense that they don’t see that they just take the idea of a personal relationship with God one step farther.

        At someone looking from the outside at all this, it seems to me like the only natural conclusion of the Reformation. That you make your own doctrine in your heart. This sort of carries on that line of thought that the most important relationship is that between man and God, not man-church-God. So even if issues of doctrine, such as the spiritual relevance a particular creed are subordinate to the personal relationship with God, not the other way around.

        I don’t really have any idea though, how is this emergent stuff really different from mainstream?
        .-= Strabo´s last blog ..The Myrmillo =-.

  4. Good post. I love the church for alot of the same reasons, and that is in spite of a mix of experiences over the years. I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Bible, but I believe any person can love God and read the Bible and have a clear grasp on the main teachings of the Bible. It is when people go beyond what is clear that we get disagreements at times. But the value of praying for each other and sharing love of Jesus and continuing to learn how to follow Him together is a wonderful thing. I am currently serving in a church that is of a denomination that I did not think fit me earlier in my walk, but I think any church can be a place to grow, as long as the pastor is committed to teaching the Bible and to a sincere relationship with Jesus. It shows up in the preaching and in how they lead.

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