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This was one of the concerns about the Iowa Supreme Court back in April.  The promotion of gay marriage in Iowa outside of the state.  I just didn’t think it would be done by a tax (hotel/motel tax) funded entity.

Two representatives for three regional visitors bureaus flew out for the three-day Gay Days, when 30,000 partipants (sic) roll into town to attend Disneyland. Gay Days is not sponsored by nor discouraged by Disney.

At the booth set up inside Disney’s Grand Californian hotel, gay and lesbian couples sampled wedding cake and posed for photos inside a frame that read, “Just Married … In Iowa City!”

The Iowa representatives took the free photos and supplied the tuxedo jackets and bridal veils. They also handed out brochures touting Iowa City, Cedar Rapids and Coralville, among other cities.

“We want people to know that if the California Legislature is unwilling to take the step to give gay couples the right to marry, then please consider coming to Iowa where we will gladly welcome you with open arms,” said Joe Jennison, executive director of the Iowa Cultural Corridor Alliance.

So it begins.  Nice.  Waiting for those lawsuits to be filed by out-of-state gay couples getting married here and looking to have their marriages be recognized in their home state.

HT: The Bean Walker

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5 comments
  1. I’m sorry, but of the states that recognize and perform gay marriages, Iowa has got to be the least exciting for out-of-staters. Mind you, Connecticut only squeaks ahead because of its proximity to NYC. Basically, Iowa is the Cedar Rapids of gay marriage. It’s convenient for the rest of the midwest (or those participating in RAGBRAI), but frankly, that’s about it.

    As for an Iowa tourism bureau trying to drum up tourism for Iowa, well, that’s their job. It might not be a bad thing for Iowa to attract workers from the coasts or retaining them in the midwest if the state is recognized as being progressive. The article notes: “But they hope that gay and lesbian couples will be intrigued and look into the possibilities in Iowa. They lead visitors to Web sites such as http://www.corridorcareers.com to see what opportunities might intrigue them.”

    1. @Argon, I guess I can take solace in the fact Iowa is a boring state.

      It might not be a bad thing for Iowa to attract workers from the coasts or retaining them in the midwest if the state is recognized as being progressive.

      It might not be a bad thing if you are a progressive, but if you are a conservative that isn’t exactly great news when you think your state is going to hell in a handbasket both socially and fiscally.

      1. @Shane Vander Hart, Iowa isn’t boring (that’s what Nebraska is for), but it certainly isn’t a prime destination in the marriage tourism industry.

        Now, if Des Moines had a drive-through wedding chapel with an Elvis impersonating Justice of the Peace, that would be something!

        Fiscally, having new, educated workers might be a boon. People willing to pull up roots and move in search of a better life also tend to be motivated (in positive sense).

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