image By Sarah Palin

Yesterday*, Mayor Bloomberg responded to my comments about the planned mosque at Ground Zero by suggesting that a decision not to allow the building of a mosque at that sacred place would somehow violate American principles of tolerance and openness.

No one is disputing that America stands for – and should stand for – religious tolerance. It is a foundation of our republic. This is not an issue of religious tolerance but of common moral sense. To build a mosque at Ground Zero is a stab in the heart of the families of the innocent victims of those horrific attacks. Just days after 9/11, the spiritual leader of the organization that wants to build the mosque, Imam Faisal Abdul Rauf, suggested that blame be placed on the innocents when he stated that the “United States’ policies were an accessory to the crime that happened” and that “in the most direct sense, Osama bin Laden is made in the USA.” Rauf refuses to recognize that Hamas is a terrorist organization dedicated to the destruction of our ally, Israel, and refuses to provide information about the sources of funding for the $100 million mosque. Rauf also plays a key role in a group behind the flotilla designed to provoke Israel in its justifiable blockade of Gaza. These are just a few of the points Americans are realizing as New York considers the proposed mosque just a stone’s throw away from 9/11’s sacred ground.

I agree with the sister of one of the 9/11 victims (and a New York resident) who said: “This is a place which is 600 feet from where almost 3,000 people were torn to pieces by Islamic extremists. I think that it is incredibly insensitive and audacious really for them to build a mosque, not only on that site, but to do it specifically so that they could be in proximity to where that atrocity happened.”

Many Americans, myself included, feel it would be an intolerable and tragic mistake to allow such a project sponsored by such an individual to go forward on such hallowed ground. This is nothing close to “religious intolerance,” it’s just common decency.

*Originally said “Earlier today” this was sent via email late last night.

10 comments
  1. Please fact check the distance. The proposed community center, exercise facility, restaurants, offices, and oh yeah, a mosque, are about as close to “at ground zero” as my house is “at the public library” or McDonald’s was “at my old school.” If you check Google maps, you’ll see that it is two blocks away, with two very large buildings, including a Catholic church separating it from ground zero and as many people between it and the site as there are in my county. There is no view of ground zero from the existing building to be renovated.

    Furthermore, there are not, nor should there be, any restrictions on where houses of worship are located. That is not the role of government or the majority. The space is as well suited to being used as a mosque as it is a deli (to the east) or a church (southeast). May I pose the question of how far away from ground zero a mosque must be placed? Is 2 blocks alright? 4 blocks? 1 mile? outside Manhattan entirely? If religious liberty is in the hands of the politically correct, please give me a distance that works for you.

    1. Regarding the distance – she was quoting from one of the victims… I don’t know how long Manhattan blocks are, but it’s not that far off in feet.

      Just looking at this from a religious liberty point of view I would tend to agree with you. However, when you consider their political beliefs about 9/11, their view of terrorism, and no disclosure of where the money is coming from…

      I have a problem with that. That’s the rub with Islam it is difficult (mostly due to the silence of moderate Muslims) to separate it from terrorist elements.

      I’m sure it will get built though against the wishes of the victims’ families. You would think if they are truly interested in reconciliation they would listen to their wishes. Just saying.

  2. Like Palin said, no one disputes that this is a free country.

    But if the intention of these muslim leaders is to build a flag pole and raise their victorious flag at Ground Zero, they should wait until all Americans have forgot 9/11.

    If their intention is to reconcile, then the center is a great venue. But Palin reminds us that these leaders are also political activists who have negative views about America. So their stated purpose may be just a screen. The media should ask more critical questions about this plan.

  3. I think they should take their community center and mosque somewhere else. Or maybe let them build the mosque near ground zero when Jews can have a synogogue in Saudi Arabia.

  4. This madness should be stopped. the evil forces cynical exploitation of the good.
    The Muslims already won this game. if they will not be permitted to build the mosque they will claim for racism and foment the rest of the Islamic world against the US.
    If they will build this mosque, then the message is clear, victory over the infidel and the stupid that allowed them to build this mosque in their most sacred location.
    Once a mosque is build there is no way to tear it down. try to do that and the whole Islamic world will be after you.

    Also ask yourself what’s the meaning of the name “Cordoba Initiative”. Cordoba is the city in Spain where the Muslim build a huge mosque after conquered it from the Christians, to symbolize their victory. same with other cities like Jerusalem, etc… they build the mosques in the most sacred location to show victory and supremacy.

    It’s all out there laud and clear and we keep behaving like idiots.

  5. Blech. What’s with all this “hallowed” and “sacred” language. There’s nothing hallowed or sacred about any of that stuff if you’re a Christian.

  6. Wayne,

    Words can be used in more than one way. She is echoing not the Bible, but Abraham Lincoln standing near the battlefields of Gettysburg.

    “But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate–we cannot consecrate–we cannot hallow-this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract”

  7. I’m with Wayne.

    First of all, since when does the US blame people in groups? That is fundamentally un-American. We weren’t attacked by Islam on 9/11, we were attacked by individuals. That those individuals were Muslims isn’t supposed to put guilt on the rest of Islam. Given that most of the one billion Muslims in the world have never attacked the US, this guilt by association thing is rather disgusting.

    Second, people are complaining about where the non-violent Muslims are. It turns out that they’re trying to build a community center in Manhattan with a 9/11 memorial aspect to it. And they’re being treated like second-class citizens at best in return for it.

    If the National Right to Life Committee opens a new office in Wichita, would we agree that they should be banned because Scott Roeder called himself a pro-lifer? Of course not. He was a kook and most of us repudiate the creep. Just like most Muslims don’t support al-Qaeda.

    Gov. Palin couldn’t be more wrong on this point if she tried. This is nothing but fear-mongering and bigotry against Muslims. It isn’t what the US is supposed to be based on.

    1. we were attacked by Muslims in the name of the Islam, sent by Muslim militant organization.
      what individuals you talking about?

      imam feisal abdul rauf is also representing a Muslim organization that was blaming that US was partly to blame for the 9/11 attack. he said that right after the attack.

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