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image John Murray (1898-1975), Scottish-born theologian and professor of Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary and Westminster Theological Seminary, wrote in his book, Redemption Accomplished and Applied wrote about the extent of Christ’s work on the Cross:

The very nature of Christ’s mission and accomplishment is involved in this question.  Did Christ come to make salvation of all men possible, to remove obstacles that stood in the way of salvation, and merely to make provision for salvation?  Or did he come to save his people?  Did he come to put all men in a savable state?  Or did he come to secure the salvation of all those who are ordained to eternal life?  Did he come to make men redeemable?  Or did he come effectually and infallibly to redeem?  The doctrine of the atonement must be radically revised if, as atonement, it applies to those who finally perish as well as to those who are heirs of eternal life.  In that event we should have to dilute the grand categories in terms which the Scripture defines the atonement and deprive them of their most precious import and glory.  This we cannot do.  The saving efficacy of expiation, propitiation, reconciliation, and redemption is too deeply embedded in these concepts, and we dare not eliminate this efficacy.  We do well to ponder the words of our Lord himself: “I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will but the will of him who sent me.  And this is the will of him who sent me, that of everything he hath given me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up in the last day,” (John 6:38-39).  Security inheres in Christ’s redemptive accomplishment.  And this means that, in respect of the persons contemplated, design and accomplishment and final realization have all the same extent, (pg. 63-64).

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