The British wanted Clark to recant signing the Declaration.
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The British wanted Clark to recant signing the Declaration.
The British wanted Clark to recant signing the Declaration.

Abraham Clark was a member of the Continental Congress and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He had two sons that were officers in the Continental Army that were captured by the British. Due to Clark’s involvement in the revolution, his sons were tortured, beaten, and starved. Legend has it that the British offered to free Clark’s sons if he would only recant his signing of the Declaration and support of the revolution. Clark is said to have refused, and generally avoided speaking of the plight of his sons in public, but he did say this: “Our fates are in the hands of an Almighty God, to whom I can with pleasure confide my own; he can save us, or destroy us; his Councils are fixed and cannot be disappointed, and all his designs will be accomplished.”

This is Brian Myers of Caffeinated Thoughts Radio with your Caffeinated Thought of the Day.

Remember you can listen to Caffeinated Thoughts Radio on air at 8:00a and 6:00p on Saturdays on The Truth Network 99.3 FM if you live in the Des Moines/Ames Metro area.  You can also listen online live here.  Also we are on iTunes!

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